Your Second Visit

At your second visit you will go through a process called. "CT Simulation". This appointment takes approximately one hour.  Here's what to expect:
  • You may be asked to change into a gown or shorts.
  • Next you will be asked to lie still on a table while the therapist and radiation oncologist take measurements and scan the area of the body needing treatment.
  • The therapist will place you in the position that you will be in for your daily treatment.
  • The therapist will also mark your skin with semi-permanent ink to ensure the radiation is directed to the same body area for each treatment. These small, semi-permanent marks are referred to as "tattoos."
  • You may shower as usual.
  • Do not wash marks off until treatment is finished.  
 
Treatment areas
Your radiation preparation and treatment will vary depending on the area treated. Here's what to expect for head and neck patients, prostate patients and breast patients:
 
Head and neck patients
For a head and neck patients, your head will have to be immobilized in preparation for your daily treatments. This part of the procedure will involve making a mask to form around your face. This mask will be used in your daily treatments. The physician may require a "bite block", a device that is held in the mouth to protect the tongue during treatments. This position may be uncomfortable but its important for the planning process. This is the position you will be in for your daily treatment.  The therapist will also place marks on the mask to ensure the radiation is directed to the same area for each treatment. If a mask is not used, then the skin will be marked with semi-permanent ink.
 
Prostate patients
You may be asked to follow prep instructions before this appointment. You will be asked to remove all clothing from the waist down and put on shorts that we give you. You will be asked to lie still on a table while the therapist and radiation oncologist take measurements and scan the area of the body needing treatment. We will make a special mold for your legs called an "alpha cradle." This is the position you be in for your daily treatment. A small plastic tube, or catheter, may be inserted into your bladder for contrast injection. The therapist will mark your skin with a semi-permanent ink to ensure the radiation is directed to the same body areas for each treatment.
 
Breast patients
For a breast patient, your arm may be positioned above your head using what is called a "breast board" or customized mold called an "alpha cradle." This position may be uncomfortable but it is important for the planning process. This is the position you will be in for your daily treatment. The therapist will also mark your skin with semi-permanent ink to ensure the radiation is directed to the same body area for each treatment.

 

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