Vision Problems

A cataract is a clouding of the lens in the eye that affects vision for millions in the United States. Most cataracts are related to aging. By age 80, more than half of all Americans either have a cataract or have had cataract surgery.

Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a disease that blurs the sharp, central vision you need for "straight-ahead" activities such as reading, sewing, and driving. AMD is a leading cause of vision loss in Americans 50 years of age and older.

Glaucoma is a group of diseases that can damage the eye's optic nerve and result in vision loss and blindness. With early treatment, individuals an often protect their eyes against serious vision loss.

Diabetic retinopathy is a complication of diabetes and a leading cause of blindness. It occurs when diabetes damages the tiny blood vessels inside the retina, the light-sensitive tissue at the back of the eye. A healthy retina is necessary for good vision.

Amblyopia, also known as lazy eye, is the medical term used when the vision in one of the eyes is reduced because the eye and the brain are not working together properly. The eye itself looks normal, but it is not being used normally because the brain is favoring the other eye.

Strabismus, also known as crossed eyes or walleye, involves deviation of the alignment of one eye in relation to the other. It is caused by a lack of coordination between the eyes. As a result, the eyes look in different directions and do not focus simultaneously on a single point.

Low vision. While most visual changes can be corrected by glasses, medicine or surgery, visual changes caused by eye disease, poor health or injury can cause permanent vision loss. If the loss is total, the result is blindness. If it is partial, the result is a vision impairment known as "low vision." A person with low vision has severely reduced visual acuity or a significantly obstructed field of vision - or both.

Locations for Surgery
Surgeries are performed at either of these locations:

Want to prevent or slow vision loss? According to many eye care professionals, the best way to accomplish this is with early detection through regular eye exams.

Even though your vision may be clear, exams can uncover changes in the eye caused by high blood pressure, diabetes, eye tumors, retinal disorders and glaucoma. Some of these have no symptoms in the early stages. Eye exams can also lead to the earliest detection of other serious health problems-including diabetes or hypertension.

Also, children should have their first eye exam before entering kindergarten.

Schedule your eye exam today!


 

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