Vaccines schedule for children

content provided by mayoclinic.com

Vaccines schedule for children

Wonder which vaccines your child needs? It can be difficult to stay on top of the vaccines schedule for children, especially when new vaccines are developed and added to the schedule. Complicating matters is that many vaccines require several doses — and sometimes, a child can get off schedule due to a shortage of vaccines or other issues.

Use the guide below to find out which vaccines your child needs now and which vaccines are coming up, based on recommendations from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. If your child misses a dose of a vaccine, ask your child's doctor about scheduling catch-up vaccines.

Birth to age 18 months

Birth

  • Hepatitis B vaccine

The first dose of the hepatitis B vaccine is usually given at birth. A second dose is given at least one month after the first dose.

Age 2 months

  • Rotavirus vaccine (RV)
  • Diphtheria toxoid, tetanus toxoid and acellular pertussis (DTaP) vaccine
  • Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib) conjugate vaccine
  • Pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV)
  • Inactivated poliovirus vaccine (IPV)

At age 2 months, a series of several vaccinations usually begins. Combination vaccines are generally recommended to reduce the number of shots.

Age 4 months

  • Rotavirus vaccine (RV)
  • Diphtheria toxoid, tetanus toxoid and acellular pertussis (DTaP) vaccine
  • Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib) conjugate vaccine
  • Pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV)
  • Inactivated poliovirus vaccine (IPV)

At age 4 months, follow-up doses to those vaccines received at age 2 months are usually given.

Age 6 months

  • Hepatitis B vaccine
  • Rotavirus vaccine (RV)
  • Diphtheria toxoid, tetanus toxoid and acellular pertussis (DTaP) vaccine
  • Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib) conjugate vaccine
  • Pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV)
  • Inactivated poliovirus vaccine (IPV)

At age 6 months, another round of the vaccines given at 2 months and 4 months is usually given, as well as the final dose of the hepatitis B vaccine.

A yearly seasonal influenza vaccine, preferably given in the fall, also is recommended beginning at age 6 months. For children younger than age 2 years, the vaccine is given as a shot. Ask your child's doctor for details.

Age 12 months

  • Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib) conjugate vaccine
  • Pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV)
  • Measles-mumps-rubella (MMR) vaccine
  • Chickenpox (varicella) vaccine
  • Hepatitis A vaccine

The final doses of both Hib vaccine and PCV and the first doses of MMR and varicella vaccines are usually given between ages 12 months and 15 months. In addition, two doses of hepatitis A — spaced at least six months apart — are usually given between ages 12 months and 23 months.

Age 15 months

  • Diphtheria toxoid, tetanus toxoid and acellular pertussis (DTaP) vaccine

The fourth dose of DTaP is usually given between ages 15 months and 18 months. In some cases, the fourth dose can be given as early as age 12 months — as long as it's been six months since the last dose.

Ages 2 to 6 years

Age 2 years

  • Pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV)
  • Pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine (PPSV)
  • Hepatitis A vaccine
  • Meningococcal conjugate vaccine (MCV4)
  • Influenza

Between ages 14 months and 59 months (4 years, 11 months), an additional dose of a new version of PCV is recommended for children who completed the earlier series of PCV — as long as it's been eight weeks since the most recent dose of PCV.

Between ages 2 and 6 years, children who haven't previously been vaccinated can be given the hepatitis A vaccine series. Children in certain high-risk groups may also need doses of PPSV and MCV4. Ask your child's doctor if your child needs these vaccines.

A yearly seasonal flu vaccine is recommended beginning at age 6 months. Your child may need one or two doses of the vaccine, depending on his or her age and whether he or she has received the flu vaccine before. For otherwise healthy children age 2 years and older, the vaccine may be given as a shot or a nasal spray.

Ages 4 to 5 years

  • Diphtheria toxoid, tetanus toxoid and acellular pertussis (DTaP) vaccine
  • Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib) conjugate vaccine
  • Pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV)
  • Inactivated poliovirus vaccine (IPV)
  • Measles-mumps-rubella (MMR) vaccine
  • Chickenpox (varicella) vaccine
  • Influenza

The final doses of IPV and DTaP, MMR and varicella vaccines are usually given before a child begins kindergarten. A combination of the MMR and varicella vaccines (MMRV) can be given instead of two separate injections to complete the final dose of each vaccine. If your child has a family history of seizures, talk to your child's doctor before MMRV is given.

Between ages 60 months (5 years) and 71 months (5 years, 11 months), children in certain high-risk groups may need an additional dose of a new version of PCV — as long as it's been eight weeks since the most recent dose of PCV. Children age 5 and older who have certain medical conditions and haven't been previously vaccinated may need one dose of Hib. Ask your child's doctor if your child needs these vaccines.

A yearly seasonal flu vaccine is recommended beginning at age 6 months. Your child may need one or two doses of the vaccine, depending on his or her age and whether he or she has received the flu vaccine before. For otherwise healthy children age 2 years and older, the vaccine may be given as a shot or a nasal spray.

Ages 7 to 18 years

Age 7 years

  • Meningococcal conjugate vaccine (MCV4)
  • Tetanus toxoid, reduced diphtheria toxoid and acellular pertussis (Tdap) vaccine
  • Pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV)
  • Pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine (PPSV)
  • Hepatitis A vaccine
  • Influenza

Between ages 7 and 10 years, children in certain high-risk groups may need doses of MCV4, PCV or PPSV. Children who haven't been fully vaccinated against pertussis need a dose of Tdap, and children who haven't previously been vaccinated can be given the hepatitis A vaccine series. Ask your child's doctor if your child needs these vaccines.

A yearly seasonal flu vaccine is recommended through age 18. Your child may need one or two doses of the vaccine, depending on his or her age and whether he or she has received the flu vaccine before. For otherwise healthy children age 2 and older, the vaccine may be given as a shot or a nasal spray.

Age 11 years

  • Tetanus toxoid, reduced diphtheria toxoid and acellular pertussis (Tdap) vaccine
  • Human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine
  • Meningococcal conjugate vaccine (MCV4)
  • Influenza

Between ages 11 and 18 years, children who completed the childhood DTaP series need a Tdap booster shot — regardless of the timing of the last vaccine containing tetanus or diphtheria toxoid — followed by a Td booster every 10 years. In addition, a single dose of MCV4 is recommended for children at age 11 or 12 — with a booster shot at age 16 — or for any adolescents ages 13 to 18 who haven't yet been vaccinated. Children given a first dose of MCV4 between ages 13 and 15 will need a booster shot between ages 16 and 18.

For girls, HPV vaccination is recommended at age 11 or 12 — although it can be given as early as age 9 — to offer protection from the viruses that cause genital warts and most cervical cancers. It's given as a series of three injections over a six-month period. For boys, a three-dose series of HPV vaccine can be given between ages 9 and 18 to help prevent genital warts.

A yearly seasonal flu vaccine is recommended through age 18. Your child may need one or two doses of the vaccine, depending on his or her age and whether he or she has received the flu vaccine before. For otherwise healthy children age 2 and older, the vaccine may be given as a shot or a nasal spray.

Last Updated: 2011-02-15
© 1998-2014 Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research (MFMER). All rights reserved. A single copy of these materials may be reprinted for noncommercial personal use only. "Mayo," "Mayo Clinic," "MayoClinic.com," "Mayo Clinic Health Information," "Reliable information for a healthier life" and the triple-shield Mayo logo are trademarks of Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research.

Terms and conditions of use

 

Bookmark and Share   E-Mail Page   Printer Friendly Version