Kohler's disease: Does it cause permanent bone damage?

content provided by mayoclinic.com

Kohler's disease: Does it cause permanent bone damage?

Question

My 8-year-old daughter was recently diagnosed with Kohler's disease. Does this cause permanent bone damage?

Renee
No state given

Answer

No. Kohler's disease is a rare bone disorder in which the navicular bone of the foot temporarily loses its blood supply (avascular necrosis). Fortunately, it causes no long-term bone damage.

When the navicular bone loses its blood supply, the tissue in the bone dies and collapses. This can cause temporary pain and swelling in the middle of the foot, and limping. However these signs and symptoms improve within a few months as the navicular bone repairs itself and returns to normal.

The exact cause of Kohler's disease — which most often affects children between the ages of 4 and 9 years — isn't known.

Navicular bone

Illustration of navicular bone

The navicular bone of the foot is located in front of the anklebone.

Last Updated: 02/09/2007
© 1998-2014 Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research (MFMER). All rights reserved. A single copy of these materials may be reprinted for noncommercial personal use only. "Mayo," "Mayo Clinic," "MayoClinic.com," "Mayo Clinic Health Information," "Reliable information for a healthier life" and the triple-shield Mayo logo are trademarks of Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research.

Terms and conditions of use

 

Bookmark and Share   E-Mail Page   Printer Friendly Version