Meningioma

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Meningioma

Question

What is a meningioma?

Ann
Alabama

Answer

Meningioma is a noncancerous (benign) brain tumor that originates in the cells of the outer covering of the brain (meninges). It may occur within the skull or in the spinal canal. Meningiomas occur more often in women than in men.

Signs and symptoms of meningioma depend on the location and size of the tumor. Even a small tumor in some parts of the brain may cause major problems. For example, a tumor that arises in the optic nerve sheath may compress the optic nerve, leading to loss of vision.

A doctor may confirm a diagnosis of meningioma based on:

  • A computerized tomography (CT) scan
  • A magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scan

Treatment of meningioma is surgical removal, when possible. In some cases, the location of the tumor makes this difficult or impossible. Even if the tumor can be removed successfully, parts of the brain may still have impaired function — especially if they've been damaged by pressure from the meningioma.

Meningioma

Image of a meningioma

A meningioma is a noncancerous (benign) brain tumor that originates in the cells of the outer covering of the brain (meninges). A doctor can confirm a diagnosis based on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) or computerized tomography (CT) scans of the brain.

Last Updated: 03/16/2006
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